Lothagam Revisited: Searching for the Earliest Turkana Basin Hominins

Molecular studies in the late 1960s demonstrated that humans are closely related to chimpanzees and gorillas, and that all three of these great ape lineages shared a relatively recent origin on the African continent. Continued study and methodological advances since this time have revealed that humans and chimpanzees are each other’s closest living relatives and [...]

By |2022-07-23T18:00:04+03:00July 15th, 2022|Featured, Projects, Research|Comments Off on Lothagam Revisited: Searching for the Earliest Turkana Basin Hominins

The Rocky Framework to the Rift

Mountains south of Lokichar. These rocks form the core of a Neoproterozoic island arc. Turkana and the East African Rift. The ‘cradle of humanity’. But what is this cradle actually made of? And why is The Rift where it is anyway? The Rift is such an important feature for nurturing primates and hominids [...]

By |2022-07-15T14:22:03+03:00June 29th, 2022|Featured, General, Research|Comments Off on The Rocky Framework to the Rift

Lothagam: Studying rivers while surviving deserts

Lothagam was too expansive, too important, and just too beautiful to be limited to a one-day visit or one blog post. As usual, the students rose with the dawn, the red rocks of Lothagam radiant with scarlet light. Quickly the nets and bedrolls were packed away, boots were laced, sunscreen applied, and we [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10+03:00February 24th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Lothagam: Studying rivers while surviving deserts

Lothagam: Red Rocks and Honey Badgers

Lothagam isn’t a name that comes up very often in Physical Anthropology classes. It wasn’t a name a lot of the students on the field school knew before they came out to TBI. But over the last few weeks there was a building drumbeat: Lothagam: the lonely hill on a distant horizon. Lothagam: the oldest [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10+03:00February 20th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Lothagam: Red Rocks and Honey Badgers

Defining the Holocene-“Anthropocene” boundary

Geology is often viewed as the study of the past, of what happened to get the planet to this point. But many geologists are equally interested in the future, using information collected on climatic, tectonic, and biological change to figure out where the planet is headed. Dr. Bob Raynolds, research associate Denver Museum of Nature [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10+03:00February 17th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Defining the Holocene-“Anthropocene” boundary

When Lake Turkana busted its banks

The shifting scale of geological inquiry can give you spatial and temporal whiplash. You go from scrutinizing a tiny quartz crystal to trying to sort out the arrival of a massive inland sea or go from contemplating a single layer of ash that took a few minutes to fall to an entire formation that took [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:11+03:00February 13th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on When Lake Turkana busted its banks

The Geologist’s Toolkit

Geology is the foundation science. Pun intended. It is the study of how everything we can lay hands on came to be. Geology draws from every investigative discipline – physics, chemistry, biology, anthropology and a lot more ologies – to examine the wheres, whens, and whys of mountains, water, and us. But before a geologist [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:11+03:00February 12th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on The Geologist’s Toolkit

Ecological explosions and volcanic diversity

In the middle of Lake Turkana, an experiment is taking place without a single person touching a pipette or checking their controls. The open-air lab is called Central Island, and few people have had the opportunity to watch the experiment in action.

By |2017-01-04T18:05:11+03:00February 8th, 2013|Field Schools|Comments Off on Ecological explosions and volcanic diversity
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