Fossils tell Stories

|Fossils tell Stories

Time is flying – the forth module kicked off Monday. Students are learning about the evolution of vertebrates (animals with a backbone) and how to identify animal fossils.  Students are also learning about the evolution of plants and how to identify plant fossils.  Knowing about what types of plants and animals were present at any given time helps to recreate past ecosystem and climate. Even though it is very hot and dry here in Turkana today, we know from fossils that this was not always the case.  For example, fossilized  crocodiles teeth and hippo bones tell us that once upon a time there was plenty of water, vegetation, and prey animals. Today students are off on a all-day field trip to find both plant and animal fossils from around 17 million years ago. Fossils will be taken back to TBI for preparation and identification.

Acacia holding the skull of a modern giraffe. Giraffe "horns" are actually made of bone and are used among males to fight.

Robert, Bean, and Izaak are learning about backbones.

Elephants have bigger jaws than Sarah- and this is a from a baby!

By | 2017-01-04T18:05:20+00:00 March 7th, 2012|Field Schools|Comments Off on Fossils tell Stories

About the Author:

Hello, I am Anja Deppe. I am a physical anthropologist and am interested in all aspects of ecology and animal behavior. In Madagascar, I investigated how mouse lemurs (tiny primates) use their senses of seeing, hearing, and smelling to avoid predators. I am currently the director of the Turkana Basin Institute Field School and share my time between Kenya and Stony Brook University.