Miocene

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Basin of the Apes

Human ancestors. This is why the Turkana Basin is on the paleontological map. Sure it preserves an intact record of the grassland ecosystem taking over East Africa and the immigration and local radiation of bizarre and wonderful plants and animals, but it’s the human story that draws us to Turkana. It’s not an inexplicable bias. [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:08-08:00April 5th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Basin of the Apes

Movin’ through the Miocene

African mammals started out weird. When the dinosaurs bowed out sixty-five million years ago after a rough season with a few Indian volcanoes and a rough weekend with an asteroid near Cancun, Africa was already a continent adrift. Much like the modern island continent of Australia, home to unique mammalian lineages like kangaroos, Tasmanian devils, [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:08-08:00March 27th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Movin’ through the Miocene

Lothagam: Studying rivers while surviving deserts

Lothagam was too expansive, too important, and just too beautiful to be limited to a one-day visit or one blog post. As usual, the students rose with the dawn, the red rocks of Lothagam radiant with scarlet light. Quickly the nets and bedrolls were packed away, boots were laced, sunscreen applied, and we [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10-08:00February 24th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Lothagam: Studying rivers while surviving deserts

Lothagam: Red Rocks and Honey Badgers

Lothagam isn’t a name that comes up very often in Physical Anthropology classes. It wasn’t a name a lot of the students on the field school knew before they came out to TBI. But over the last few weeks there was a building drumbeat: Lothagam: the lonely hill on a distant horizon. Lothagam: the oldest [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10-08:00February 20th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Lothagam: Red Rocks and Honey Badgers
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