Field School Visits 3 Ancient Fossil Sites

|Field School Visits 3 Ancient Fossil Sites

Today the Field School students spent the day in the field looking for fossils in three different sites: Lothodok, the edge of the Kalodir deposits and Maurorot. All these sites are north of TBI and represent different slices of time that have been preserved in the fossil record.

Prof Boyer explains the importance of the Lothodok site

Prof Boyer explains the importance of the Lothodok site

 

As before, students learned that patience and looking carefully are key to finding fossils

Students start searching for fossils

Students start searching for fossils

 

Kathleen searches for fossils

Kathleen searches for fossils

 

Hard work in the sun!

Hard work in the sun!

 

One of the first finds was the tusk of a an ancient elephant species:

 

Francis, Zack, Vaishanavi and Kathleen document the ancient tusk

Francis, Zack, Vaishanavi and Kathleen document the ancient tusk

 

I climbed a small hill to get a view of the landscape and fossil hunt. Even though this may seem like a bleak place, it is rich in fossils and has contributed a lot to our understanding of evolution and the early fauna of this part of the world.

A view of the fossil hunt from above

A view of the fossil hunt from above

From Lohtodok we travelled on to the edge of the Kalodir deposits where we searched for fossils near the road. Here is part of an ancient turtle’s shell that has been preserved:

Cleaning the ancient turtle shell

Cleaning the ancient turtle shell

 

The final stop on this long day in the field was Maurorot, where more recent fossils can be found.

Fossil Snail shell in bank

Fossil Snail shell in bank

 

We rested here for a bit, and took in the view before heading back to TBI:

Catherine enjoys the view at Maurorot

Catherine enjoys the view at Maurorot

 

More from the TBI Field School soon!

 

By | 2017-01-04T18:05:05+00:00 October 14th, 2013|Field Schools|Comments Off on Field School Visits 3 Ancient Fossil Sites

About the Author:

Hello! I'm Dino Martins, an entomologist interested in how insects keep the planet running, the biology of vectors and more broadly in the evolution of life and our role in a sustainable world. I teach for the Turkana Basin Field School and serve as the Academic Field Director and am a Research Assistant Professor at Stony Brook University.