Lake Turkana

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Visit to the Kerio Delta

The TBI Field School students visited the Kerio Delta a few days ago to get a first glimpse of the complex freshwater ecology and dynamics that affect the deltas of Lake Turkana. We were hosted by a group of local fishermen whose boats we used to travel into the mouth of the Kerio Delta. [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:53-08:00September 15th, 2014|Field Schools|Comments Off on Visit to the Kerio Delta

The 12th Human Evolution Workshop at TBI: ‘Handy-man’ in 2014

The twelfth annual Stony Brook Human Evolution Workshop was held at the Turkana Basin Institute’s (TBI) Turkwel research facility, between August 5-9th, 2014. The workshop was organized to mark the 50th Anniversary of the publication by Louis Leakey, Phillip Tobias and John Napier of the paper that established Homo habilis as a taxon (Leakey, L. S. [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:53-08:00August 9th, 2014|Featured|Comments Off on The 12th Human Evolution Workshop at TBI: ‘Handy-man’ in 2014

Turkana moths make a DNA debut!

The Turkana ecosystem is home to a wide range of species, including many different kinds of insects. One of the challenges of understanding biodiversity is the fact that many species have not yet been classified, and are in general poorly known or studied. This is true for most of the remote, tropical areas of the [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:56-08:00February 7th, 2014|General|Comments Off on Turkana moths make a DNA debut!

Lobolo and Eliye Springs: The final field for the field school

The Pleistocene is sometimes called the Ice Age, but ice was as rare 2 million years ago as it is today in the Turkana Basin. Instead the glaciers in the north caused the deserts and arid grasslands to expand as the ice advanced and the expansion of the forests when the ice retreated. Our early [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:07-08:00April 12th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Lobolo and Eliye Springs: The final field for the field school

Lothagam: Red Rocks and Honey Badgers

Lothagam isn’t a name that comes up very often in Physical Anthropology classes. It wasn’t a name a lot of the students on the field school knew before they came out to TBI. But over the last few weeks there was a building drumbeat: Lothagam: the lonely hill on a distant horizon. Lothagam: the oldest [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10-08:00February 20th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Lothagam: Red Rocks and Honey Badgers

Defining the Holocene-“Anthropocene” boundary

Geology is often viewed as the study of the past, of what happened to get the planet to this point. But many geologists are equally interested in the future, using information collected on climatic, tectonic, and biological change to figure out where the planet is headed. Dr. Bob Raynolds, research associate Denver Museum of Nature [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:10-08:00February 17th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on Defining the Holocene-“Anthropocene” boundary

When Lake Turkana busted its banks

The shifting scale of geological inquiry can give you spatial and temporal whiplash. You go from scrutinizing a tiny quartz crystal to trying to sort out the arrival of a massive inland sea or go from contemplating a single layer of ash that took a few minutes to fall to an entire formation that took [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:05:11-08:00February 13th, 2013|Field Schools, General|Comments Off on When Lake Turkana busted its banks

Ecological explosions and volcanic diversity

In the middle of Lake Turkana, an experiment is taking place without a single person touching a pipette or checking their controls. The open-air lab is called Central Island, and few people have had the opportunity to watch the experiment in action.

By |2017-01-04T18:05:11-08:00February 8th, 2013|Field Schools|Comments Off on Ecological explosions and volcanic diversity