Turkana Basin Institute geoBlog

|Turkana Basin Institute geoBlog|

Stony Brook professor publishes stone tool book

Stony Brook University professor John J. Shea recently published a new work through Cambridge University Press entitled Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates. From the publisher's description: In Stone Tools in Human Evolution, John J. Shea argues that over the last three million years hominins' technological strategies shifted from occasional tool use, [...]

By | November 28th, 2016|General|Comments Off on Stony Brook professor publishes stone tool book

Trip to Nariokotome

We left TBI Turkwel Monday morning for our camping trip, from which we would be returning on Wednesday afternoon. We would be camping for two nights near the village of Nariokotome; the famous hominin site of Nariokotome boy, KNM-WT 15000, is only a few minutes away! On our drive to Nariokotome, we would be making [...]

By | November 19th, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School|Comments Off on Trip to Nariokotome

Rolling back to the Holocene

On Friday, we traveled to the Holocene site of Napaget, a massive and artefact-rich sand dune that overlooks the beautiful Lake Turkana. The site is about an hour away (as the lorry drives), and on the way we passed some truly impressive termite mounds, almost big enough for a person to live in (I wonder [...]

By | November 14th, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School|Comments Off on Rolling back to the Holocene

Afternoon Knaps

The next morning in class, we were introduced to archaeological vocabulary, necessary to accurately understand and describe stone artefacts. We learned how to describe the physical characteristics, such as: ventral (internal) and dorsal (external) sides of a flake; cortex, or the external skin of the original rock; and negatives (signs of a flake removal) and positives [...]

By | November 13th, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School, General|Comments Off on Afternoon Knaps

Using tools and monkeying around

For the last module of the TBI Origins Field School, Archaeology of the Turkana Basin, we headed to the west side of the lake. On this side, the students will be living at the TBI Turkwel Research Facility which is set up very similar to Ileret. However, we are now not too far from world [...]

By | November 8th, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School|Comments Off on Using tools and monkeying around

Crawling for Monkeys and a Friendly Farewell

Because of the successful end of our last excursion in the field, we returned to the same site to try to find other remnants of this ancient primate. When we got back, we did a hill crawl to cover the area below the find, with the thought that over time the fossil skeleton may have [...]

By | November 6th, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School|Comments Off on Crawling for Monkeys and a Friendly Farewell

What do our teeth tell us?

In Human Evolution this week, we discussed how animals with different diets will have coinciding differences in their teeth morphology as well as in other cranial areas, such as the zygomatic and mandible. Similar dietary morphology patterns are observed in hominins as well, which can tell us a lot about both the environment they were living in [...]

By | November 3rd, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School|Comments Off on What do our teeth tell us?

What do the TBI field school students do during their free-time?

During the TBI field school, it is important to take time off from studying and have a bit of leisure time. When the students are constantly working, may it be preparing for an exam or putting together a presentation, it is sometimes hard to stop and take a break. However, we always make sure the students [...]

By | November 1st, 2016|Fall Field School 2016, Field School|Comments Off on What do the TBI field school students do during their free-time?