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|Scott Bjelland

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So far Scott Bjelland has created 19 blog entries.

Stony Brook professor publishes stone tool book

Stony Brook University professor John J. Shea recently published a new work through Cambridge University Press entitled Stone Tools in Human Evolution: Behavioral Differences among Technological Primates. From the publisher's description: In Stone Tools in Human Evolution, John J. Shea argues that over the last three million years hominins' technological strategies shifted from occasional tool use, [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:29+00:00November 28th, 2016|General|Comments Off on Stony Brook professor publishes stone tool book

TBI hosts thirteenth HEW: Rethinking Tool-making

The Turkana Basin Institute will host the thirteenth workshop of the Stony Brook/TBI Human Evolution Workshop series at its Turkwel campus from August 2 - 6. Entitled Rethinking Tool-making, the workshop is organized by archaeologists Drs. Sonia Harmand and Hélène Roche. The 2015 discovery of the earliest-known stone tools at Lomekwi 3 in West Turkana [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:34+00:00June 20th, 2016|Events|Comments Off on TBI hosts thirteenth HEW: Rethinking Tool-making

Meave Leakey awarded National Geographic’s Hubbard Medal

Meave Leakey, Director of Field Research at TBI and research professor at Stony Brook University’s Department of Anthropology, received the 2016 Hubbard Medal, named for the first president of the National Geographic Society, Gardiner Greene Hubbard, often called National Geographic’s highest honor. The award is given for lifetime achievement in areas of research, discovery, and exploration. Meave Leakey in [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:34+00:00June 15th, 2016|Featured|Comments Off on Meave Leakey awarded National Geographic’s Hubbard Medal

Evidence of a prehistoric massacre extends the history of warfare

Skeletal remains of a group of foragers massacred around 10,000 years ago, on the shores of a lagoon in what is now southwestern Turkana, is unique evidence of a violent encounter between clashing groups of ancient hunter-gatherers, and suggests the “presence of warfare” in late Stone Age foraging societies. The fossilised bones of a group [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:38+00:00January 20th, 2016|Featured|Comments Off on Evidence of a prehistoric massacre extends the history of warfare

In conversation with Richard Leakey

Journalist and presenter Zeinab Badawi (BBC) will be conversing with Richard Leakey as he reflects on his life's work at the Royal Society in London next Wednesday, October 21 at 6:30 PM London time (1:30 PM EST). Leakey's career over the past fifty years has spanned paleoanthropology, wildlife conservation and campaigning for political justice. This [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:40+00:00October 16th, 2015|Events|Comments Off on In conversation with Richard Leakey

New website enables online fossil hunting

The Turkana Basin Institute, in collaboration with the University of Bradford, has set up a web site fossilfinder.org, recruiting an army of ‘citizen scientists’ to help discover fossils and other ancient artefacts using the unique online platform “Zooniverse”. fOssilfinder.org is a pioneering project, funded in part by the Arts and Humanities Research Council, enabling amateur [...]

By |2017-01-04T18:04:41+00:00September 8th, 2015|Featured|Comments Off on New website enables online fossil hunting

Oldest Stone Artifacts Found in Kenya’s Turkana Basin

The West Turkana Archaeological Project team has found the earliest known stone artifacts, dating to 3.3 million years ago. The discovery pushes back the beginning of the archaeological record by 700,000 years, or by over a quarter of humanity's previously-known material cultural history.

By |2017-01-04T18:04:41+00:00May 18th, 2015|Featured|Comments Off on Oldest Stone Artifacts Found in Kenya’s Turkana Basin