demingyang

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About Deming Yang

Hello! My name is Deming Yang. I am the Resident Director for the Global Innovation Field School, Summer 2017. I am a PhD candidate in the IDPAS program at Stony Brook University and a TBI graduate fellow. Before joining Stony Brook for graduate school, I worked in Kenya for three years and gained amazing field experience. I have broad interests in early hominin evolution and paleoecology. My research is about dietary evolution in Plio-Pleistocene pig lineages.

TBI assists local communities in the wake of disastrous floods

On Tuesday May 30th, a vast storm hit the Ileret area and brought an immense amount of rain. Within a short period of 9 hours, TBI Ileret facility documented a record-high rainfall of more than 200 mm (8 inches). This amount is much more than a typical rainstorm at Ileret (~20 mm), and more than [...]

By | 2017-06-20T13:07:56+00:00 June 20th, 2017|Featured, Field Schools, Global Innovation 2017, Global Innovation Field School, Local Community Outreach|Comments Off on TBI assists local communities in the wake of disastrous floods

Global Innovation Field School 2017 begins!

As most people are enjoying the beach and sunshine in the US, some Stony Brook students took a long shot and came to the shores of Lake Turkana, Kenya. They are here for the brand-new Global Innovation Field School! The Global Innovation summer program is organized by the College of Engineering & Applied Sciences, Stony [...]

By | 2017-06-04T16:54:59+00:00 May 27th, 2017|Featured, Field Schools, Global Innovation 2017|Comments Off on Global Innovation Field School 2017 begins!

Congratulations to Spring Field School Graduates!

It is finally the end of the Archaeology module and our field school students have learned a lot about stone tools. Now it is time to put them in good use! Cracking nuts using a hammer stone and an anvil is just the beginning of technology. To convince ourselves that the stone flakes we made are capable [...]

By | 2017-06-04T17:01:35+00:00 May 12th, 2017|Featured, Field Schools, Spring 2017|Comments Off on Congratulations to Spring Field School Graduates!

Some serious digging in the dirt

As the field school comes close to its end, students finally had the opportunity to experience how different pieces of information can be put together to tell a compelling story of human history. And we do it the TBI style: in the field! Equipped with all kinds of digging tools ranging from trowels to buckets, [...]

By | 2017-04-27T21:47:03+00:00 April 27th, 2017|Field Schools, Spring 2017|Comments Off on Some serious digging in the dirt

The grandeur of Lothagam

The TBI Turkwel campus has one of the best outlook points around the area: the roof of the research labs. From there, several landmarks in the region are clearly visible. Towards the south, there are two peaks barely noticeable above the horizon. They are in the area known as Lothagam, geologically one of the most [...]

By | 2017-04-30T15:15:36+00:00 April 20th, 2017|Field Schools, Spring 2017|Comments Off on The grandeur of Lothagam

The Nariokotome camping trip

Now that our field school students have gained a good understanding of how early stone tools are made, it is time to find some stone tools in the field! And that is what the students have been waiting for! The Origins Field School has a tradition of visiting one of the most well-known hominin sites [...]

By | 2017-04-12T20:39:37+00:00 April 12th, 2017|Field Schools, Spring 2017|Comments Off on The Nariokotome camping trip

Visiting hominin ancestors

It is now the second week of the human evolution module of the Origins Field School and our dedicated students are ready for a new set of adventures! In the classroom, we have been learning about how different evolutionary theories have been developed around a rather limited hominin fossil record. With all the gaps in [...]

By | 2017-03-27T12:34:23+00:00 March 27th, 2017|Field Schools, Spring 2017|Comments Off on Visiting hominin ancestors

A family tree of Caminalcules

Families are considered functional units of a typical human society. Depending on the geographic and cultural origin, families can come in different shapes and sizes. The most straightforward way to relate all the members of an extended family is to draw a family tree. Most people know their immediate relatives such as a parent or [...]

By | 2017-03-26T12:44:25+00:00 March 22nd, 2017|Field Schools, Spring 2017|Comments Off on A family tree of Caminalcules