Some Friendly Competition

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Yesterday, students participated in an illustration competition. After learning about the Acheulean stone tool industry in lecture, Dr. Harmand showed the students several Acheulean artifacts from the TBI collections, including handaxes, cleavers, and cores. Students were then tasked to accurately illustrate one of the artifacts.

Artists at work.

Artists at work.

Students worked extra diligently when they found out there were prizes to be won!

Alex employs extreme concentration as she draws her core.

Alex employs extreme concentration as she draws her core.

Katie evaluates her masterpiece from a higher vantage point.

Katie evaluates her masterpiece from a higher vantage point.

 

While students displayed varying levels of artistic talent, they all did their best to make their illustrations as accurate as possible.

Acheulean Handaxe: A Triptych

Acheulean Handaxe: A Triptych (sort of).

Three colleagues of Dr. Harmand evaluated the drawings and chose winners for Most Accurate, Most Artistic, and Least Accurate (aka worst).

The panel of impartial judges.

The panel of impartial judges.

In the end, Ned won for Most Accurate, Alex for Most Artistic, and Maggie (always the good sport) for Least Accurate.

The talented group poses with their drawings, with Ned, Most Accurate winner, front and center.

The talented group poses with their drawings, with Ned, Most Accurate winner, front and center.

Next week, students will use their new skills to draw bone harpoon points. In the meantime, Ned and Alex will get to enjoy the bars of chocolate they so deservedly won.

 

By | 2017-01-04T18:04:51+00:00 November 8th, 2014|Field Schools|Comments Off on Some Friendly Competition

About the Author:

Hello! I am Abby Koppa, the TBI Field School TA for Fall 2014, a third-year PhD student at Stony Brook University in the Department of Ecology and Evolution, and a TBI Graduate Fellow. My research interests include the nutritional and mechanical properties of East African savanna plants, paleoecology, and hominin paleodiet.