Final Field Day in Napaget

|Final Field Day in Napaget

Today, students headed out for their last day in the field before the Field School ends on Sunday. It’s hard to believe that we have already reached the last week!

Dr. Harmand took the students to Napaget, a very rich Holocene archaeological site right next to beautiful Lake Turkana. Both the view and the artifacts were spectacular!

Sunny, sandy Napaget.

Sunny, sandy Napaget.

After climbing a few steep sand dunes, students lined up and used their well-trained eyes to spot and flag pottery sherds, cores, flakes, microliths, fossil bone (including some very nice fish fragments, spotted by Yan), shells, and even some beads.

Students on the prowl for exciting archaeological finds.

Students on the prowl for exciting archaeological finds.

The site was so rich that students quickly ran out of flags.

Pot sherds in the sand.

Pot sherds in the sand.

Quartz flakes.

Quartz flakes.

After combing one half of the deflation surface, students lined back up to search the other.

Getting ready to give it another go.

Getting ready to give it another go.

This time, students found concentrations of pot sherds and ostrich eggshell and tried to do some refitting.

Maggie and Sara work on refitting a pot.

Maggie and Sara work on refitting a pot.

Dr. Harmand offers advice.

Dr. Harmand offers advice.

Trying to fit some ostrich egg shell back together.

Trying to fit some ostrich eggshell back together.

Unfortunately, there weren’t enough sherds or eggshell fragments to do a full refit, but the students still made pretty good progress. After lunch, students got to take a refreshing swim in Lake Turkana before heading back to the compound.

Stay tuned for adventures in knapping later in the week!

By | 2017-01-04T18:04:51+00:00 November 11th, 2014|Field Schools|Comments Off on Final Field Day in Napaget

About the Author:

Hello! I am Abby Koppa, the TBI Field School TA for Fall 2014, a third-year PhD student at Stony Brook University in the Department of Ecology and Evolution, and a TBI Graduate Fellow. My research interests include the nutritional and mechanical properties of East African savanna plants, paleoecology, and hominin paleodiet.