To the Rocks!

|To the Rocks!

The Geology module of the Fall 2013 Field School is underway and the students are enthusiastically hard at work. Dr. Chris Lepre of Rutgers University is leading the class through the geologic events that have shaped East Africa and by extension our own evolution. Class discussions have included geologic time, radioisotopes, stratigraphy, hydrology, tectonics and the East African Rift System.

For their first lab exercise, the students hiked into the Turkwel hills and documented stratigraphic columns in the outcrops. One of the questions posed to them: Can you identify geologic features at Turkwel that suggest the Law of Superposition has been violated? The students are still comparing their observations.

In their field drawings, the students paid special interest to the pattern of volcanic tuffs in the geologic record. Importantly, tuff layers contain the elements necessary for radiometric dating and are therefore keys to establishing a temporal context to evolution through the Plio- Pleistocene. It is evident that Geology is the fundamental science in understanding the past. More to comeā€¦

A morning lecture with Dr. Lepre.

GEO303 – A morning lecture with Dr. Lepre.

GEO303 - Catherine examines the composition of surface rocks at Turkwel.

GEO303 – Catherine examines the composition of surface rocks at Turkwel.

Dr. Lepre explains geologic processes at Turkwel.

GEO303 – Dr. Lepre explains geologic processes at Turkwel.

Zach and Chelsea measure strike and dip at Turkwel.

GEO303 – Zach and Chelsea measure strike and dip at Turkwel.

Lorraine sketches stratigraphy at Turkwel.

GEO303 – Lorraine sketches stratigraphy at Turkwel.

 

 

 

 

By | 2017-01-04T18:05:05+00:00 September 26th, 2013|Field Schools|Comments Off on To the Rocks!

About the Author:

Steven Heritage earned his Baccalaureate at the University of Hawai'i double majoring in biology and anthropology. He is currently a PhD student at Stony Brook University where he serves as a graduate instructor of human anatomy. He is also a Turkana Basin Institute fellow and the graduate representative for MorphoBank. Steven's dissertation research focuses on the phylogenetic biology and comparative anatomy of Afrotherian mammals and their Paleogene fossil record.