Glimpses of the Past

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The students have been learning more about the geology of the Turkana Basin.  Today they learned about how layers of sediment form (stratigraphy) and what these layers can tell us about the nature of past environments.   Sediments are particularly useful in telling us about the topography (profile) of landscapes and the presence of rivers, lakes or oceans.  In an outcrop at the Turkwel cliffs, down river from the TBI campus, students could observe the different layers of sediment that had formed over the past 200,000 years. Students also measured river depth, width, water speed, and collected sediment samples to compare it to the up river TBI location.

Devora, Anna, and Izaak in front of the Turkwel cliff, that clearly reveals the many different layers of sediment accumulated over 200,000 years.

 

Fine sediments such as clay and silt make a great face mask according to Bean.

Sometimes unexpected visitors appear - note the curious camel !

 

Benson, James, and Bean swear that short exercise breaks enhance focus.

By | 2017-01-04T18:05:21+00:00 February 9th, 2012|Field Schools|Comments Off on Glimpses of the Past

About the Author:

Hello, I am Anja Deppe. I am a physical anthropologist and am interested in all aspects of ecology and animal behavior. In Madagascar, I investigated how mouse lemurs (tiny primates) use their senses of seeing, hearing, and smelling to avoid predators. I am currently the director of the Turkana Basin Institute Field School and share my time between Kenya and Stony Brook University.